IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Labour Market Information for Employers and Economic Immigrants in Canada: A Country Study


  • Vikram Rai



This report draws lessons from the Canadian immigration experience that can contribute to improving the labour market outcomes of immigrants and alleviate barriers related to labour market information issues. Foreign-born workers often lack the necessary information to learn about opportunities in the Canadian labour market, which can prevent highly-skilled workers from finding employment in their field, to the detriment of the Canadian economy. We examine the services provided to immigrants in Canada by federal and provincial governments, and the large role played by the non-profit sector in facilitating the delivery of information and services to immigrants in order to lessen the informational barriers to immigrant employment. We further identify best practices from Canada, which include establishing national standards for the recognition of foreign qualification; simplifying the delivery of services by using one-stop shops or single-points-of-contact; involving local stakeholders in the development of policy and delivery of service; and maintaining a flexible immigration policy. Identifying and addressing the specific needs of newcomers to Canada has had a strong positive impact on their labour market outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Vikram Rai, 2013. "Labour Market Information for Employers and Economic Immigrants in Canada: A Country Study," CSLS Research Reports 2013-01, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:resrep:1305

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Andrew Sharpe & Ian Currie, 2008. "Competitive Intensity as Driver of Innovation and Productivity Growth: A Synthesis of the Literature," CSLS Research Reports 2008-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    2. Statistics Canada, 2006. "Producing Hours Worked for the SNA in Order to Measure Productivity: The Canadian Experience," The Canadian Productivity Review 2006004e, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division.
    3. Diewert, Erwin, 2008. "The Measurement of Nonmarket Sector Outputs and Inputs Using Cost Weights," Economics working papers diewert-08-01-18-09-21-07, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 13 Nov 2008.
    4. Andrew Sharpe & Peter Harrison, 2009. "A Detailed Analysis of the Productivity Performance of the Canadian Forest Products Sector Since 2000," CSLS Research Reports 2009-09, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    5. Trueblood, Michael A. & Ruttan, Vernon W., 1992. "A Comparison Of Multifactor Productivity Calculations Of The U.S. Agricultural Sector," Staff Papers 14165, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    6. Jean-Francois Arsenault & Andrew Sharpe, 2008. "An Analysis of the Causes of Weak Labour Productivity Growth in Canada since 2000," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 16, pages 14-39, Spring.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sls:resrep:1305. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CSLS). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.