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The Impact of a New Quality Management Practice on Firm Performance: Evidence From Pakistan

Author

Listed:
  • Mahvish Farhan

    (Sheffield Hallam University, UK)

  • Karl Taylor

    (Department of Economics, University of Sheffield, UK)

Abstract

This paper uses a novel firm level data set to investigate the impact of a unique quality management practice on the production and productivity of a large-scale garments manufacturer in Pakistan. The analysis provides evidence that production complexity is an important element in determining the impact of management practices, as there are sizeable differences in the effects between complex and basic lines of assembly. Most specifications show that the implementation of the new quality management practice has a negative impact on lines at the extreme ends of the complexity spectrum, while conversely it has a positive impact on those basic lines which exhibit the highest levels of complexity. We find evidence consistent with a quantity-quality trade off, in that whilst the implementation of the new management practice generally adversely impacted upon productivity it had the desired effect of reducing the number of daily quality defects observed after the intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahvish Farhan & Karl Taylor, 2021. "The Impact of a New Quality Management Practice on Firm Performance: Evidence From Pakistan," Working Papers 2021008, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2021008
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    quality management practice; productivity; production complexity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior
    • M2 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Economics
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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