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El consumo de productos lácteos en España, 1950-2010


  • Fernando Collantes



This paper, a case study of the great transformations undergone by food consumption patterns in Spain since c. 1950, reconstructs the evolution of the consumption of milk and milk derivatives. The paper homogenizes and triangulates the information given by several statistical sources, which use different methodologies and cover different periods. This information is combined with qualitative material. Milk consumption grew rapidly during the first half of the period and, after a phase of stagnation, started to decrease in the last years of the twentieth century. On the contrary, the consumption of (an increasing variety of) milk derivatives grew steadily throughout the whole of the period. The contrast between the respective trajectories of milk and its derivatives underlines the relevant role played by the elaboration and diversification of foodstuffs in the shaping of consumption patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Collantes, 2012. "El consumo de productos lácteos en España, 1950-2010," Documentos de Trabajo de la Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria 1204, Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria.
  • Handle: RePEc:seh:wpaper:1204

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    food consumption; Spain; milk; milk derivatives; nutritional transition;

    JEL classification:

    • N34 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: 1913-
    • N54 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Europe: 1913-
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • R22 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Other Demand

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