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Effects of oil price shocks on German business cycles

  • Tobias Zimmermann
  • Torsten Schmidt

    ()

In this paper we analyse to what extend movements in oil prices can help to explain business cycle fluctuations in Germany. To clarify whether oil price shocks have effects on real economic activity in Germany at all we use two different versions of a real business cycle model namely a closed and a small open economy version and introduce oil as an additional factor in the production function. Like in the related literature (Kim and Loungani 1992; de Miguel et al. 2003) in both versions oil price shocks have effects on real economic activity. In a second step we use these models to analyse whether the effects of oil price movements have changed over time. Our hypothesis is that the effects decreased since the seventies because oil use became a less important factor for industrial production. Therefore we split our data set into two subperiods namely from 1970 to 1986 and from 1987 to 2000 and calibrate our models to both subsets. In this model economy oil price shocks contribute substantially to business cycle fluctuations in the seventies and early eighties but only to a very limited extend in the late eighties and nineties

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Paper provided by Society for Computational Economics in its series Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 with number 212.

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Date of creation: 11 Nov 2005
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Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf5:212
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  1. In-Moo Kim & Prakash Loungani, 1991. "The role of energy in real business cycle models," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 91-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  2. Alfred Maussner & Julius Spatz, 2003. "Determinants of Business Cycles in Small Scale Macroeconomic Models: The German Case," Kiel Working Papers 1158, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  3. Finn E. Kydland & Edward C. Prescott, 1994. "The computational experiment: an econometric tool," Staff Report 178, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  4. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Huffman, Gregory W, 1988. "Investment, Capacity Utilization, and the Real Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 402-17, June.
  5. Correia, I. & Rabelo, S. & Naves, J.C., 1994. "Business Cycles in a Small Open Economy," RCER Working Papers 382, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  6. Carlos de Miguel & Baltasar Manzano & Jose M. Martin-Moreno, 2003. "Oil Price Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 47-61.
  7. Rotemberg, Julio J & Woodford, Michael, 1996. "Imperfect Competition and the Effects of Energy Price Increases on Economic Activity," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 550-77, November.
  8. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
  9. King, Robert G. & Plosser, Charles I. & Rebelo, Sergio T., 1988. "Production, growth and business cycles : I. The basic neoclassical model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 195-232.
  10. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Waston, Mark, 1997. "Systematic Monetary Policy and the Effects of Oil Price Shocks," Working Papers 97-25, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  11. Hooker, Mark A., 1996. "What happened to the oil price-macroeconomy relationship?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 195-213, October.
  12. Asche, Frank & Gjolberg, Ole & Volker, Teresa, 2003. "Price relationships in the petroleum market: an analysis of crude oil and refined product prices," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 289-301, May.
  13. Sylvain Leduc & Keith Sill, 2001. "A quantitative analysis of oil-price shocks, systematic monetary policy, and economic downturns," Working Papers 01-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  14. Peter Brandner & Klaus Neusser, 1992. "Business cycles in open economies: Stylized facts for Austria and Germany," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 67-87, March.
  15. Thomas Harjes, 1997. "Real business cycles in an open economy: An application to Germany," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 133(4), pages 635-656, December.
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