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DEA Applied to a Gauteng Sample of South African Public Hospitals

Author

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  • Kibambe Jacques Ngoie
  • Steven Koch

Abstract

The ability of the South African government to provide antiretroviral medication to those in need will be determined by the ability of the public health services sector to efficiently provide that medication. If the delivery of other health services can be used as a guide, the goals of the anti-retroviral rollout will not be met. The research presented in this paper provides a preliminary analysis of the delivery of a few health care services by the public sector in Gauteng, South Africa. The data for the study was especially difficult to collect, suggesting the need for hospital level data information systems, as well as staff trained to analyse the information collected. The empirical results from the analysis suggest that services provided by small-scale medical facilities waste fewer resources, while medical centres offering more technical services, such as surgeries, also appear to deliver medical services more efficiently.

Suggested Citation

  • Kibambe Jacques Ngoie & Steven Koch, 2005. "DEA Applied to a Gauteng Sample of South African Public Hospitals," Working Papers 28, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:28
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    Cited by:

    1. Kibambe Jacques Ngoie & Niek Schoeman, 2009. "Modelling the Impact of Automatic Fiscal Stabilisers on Output Stabilisation in South Africa," Working Papers 129, Economic Research Southern Africa.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • C65 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Miscellaneous Mathematical Tools

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