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The co-operative as institution for human development


  • Sara Vicari
  • Pasquale De Muro


Toward a reassessment of the role of co-operative enterprises as a tool for fighting poverty both from the academic community and the international organisations, the paper aims at contributing to the understanding of the added value of the co-operative form of business especially in a people-centred development setting. In particular, in applying the human development and capability approach to co-operative economics and therefore by linking co-operatives to the concept of well-being, the paper contributes to shifting the co-operative thinking beyond the homo oeconomicus rational choice perspective bringing it closer to the reason why people adhere to collective livelihood strategies, thus providing greater insight for policies and practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Vicari & Pasquale De Muro, 2012. "The co-operative as institution for human development," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' 0156, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
  • Handle: RePEc:rtr:wpaper:0156

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    More about this item


    co-operative enterprises; human development; capability approach; institutions; economic democracy; poverty eradication;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • P13 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Cooperative Enterprises

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