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Turning Water into Carbon: Carbon sequestration vs. water flow in the Murray-Darling Basin

Author

Listed:
  • Peggy Schrobback

    () (Risk & Sustainable Management Group, School of Economics, University of Queensland)

  • David Adamson

    () (Risk and Sustainable Management Group, University of Queensland)

  • John Quiggin

    () (Risk & Sustainable Management Group, School of Economics, University of Queensland)

Abstract

Large scale forest plantations in the Murray-Darling Basin may be embraced as a carbon sequestration mechanism under a Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. However, increased tree plantation will be associated with reduced inflows to river systems because of increased transpiration, interception and evaporation. Therefore, an unregulated change in land management is most likely to have a dramatic impact on the water availability. This will exacerbate the impacts of climate change projected in the Garnaut Review. This paper examines the implications of unrestricted changes in land use. These results should suggest the true costs to society from carbon sequestration by determining the tradeoffs between timber production and agricultural products.

Suggested Citation

  • Peggy Schrobback & David Adamson & John Quiggin, 2009. "Turning Water into Carbon: Carbon sequestration vs. water flow in the Murray-Darling Basin," Murray-Darling Program Working Papers WP2M09, Risk and Sustainable Management Group, University of Queensland.
  • Handle: RePEc:rsm:murray:m09_2
    as

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    File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/rsmg/WP/WPM09_02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Adamson & Thilak Mallawaarachchi & John Quiggin, 2007. "Water use and salinity in the Murray-Darling Basin: A state-contingent model ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(3), pages 263-281, September.
    2. Adamson, David & Mallawaarachchi, Thilak & Quiggin, John C., 2006. "State-contingent modelling of the Murray Darling Basin: implications for the design of property rights," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 137977, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Michael D. Young & Jim C. McColl, 2009. "Double trouble: the importance of accounting for and defining water entitlements consistent with hydrological realities ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(1), pages 19-35, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nordblom, T.L. & Christy, B.P. & Finlayson, J.D. & Roberts, A.M. & Kelly, J.A., 2010. "Least cost land-use changes for targeted catchment salt load and water yield impacts in south eastern Australia," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 97(6), pages 811-823, June.
    2. P. Polglase & A. Reeson & C. Hawkins & K. Paul & A. Siggins & J. Turner & D. Crawford & T. Jovanovic & T. Hobbs & K. Opie & J. Carwardine & A. Almeida, 2013. "Potential for forest carbon plantings to offset greenhouse emissions in Australia: economics and constraints to implementation," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 121(2), pages 161-175, November.
    3. Nordblom, Thomas L. & Finlayson, John D. & Hume, Iain H., 2012. "Upstream demand for water use by new tree plantations imposes externalities on downstream irrigated agriculture and wetlands," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 56(4), December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Murray Darling Basin; water; environmental flows;

    JEL classification:

    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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