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Ecosystem Services: Quantification, Policy Applications, and Current Federal Capabilities


  • Scarlett, Lynn

    () (Resources for the Future)

  • Boyd, James W.

    () (Resources for the Future)


The study describes existing federal policies that permit or promote ecosystem services analysis, management, investments, and markets. Our survey discusses: 1) current programs that stimulate or support the measurement of ecosystem services; 2) existing federal drivers of ecosystem services analysis; and 3) programs that stimulate investment in ecosystem services. Understanding existing capacity is important to federal and other leaders who see opportunities for environmental policy innovations—such as payments, markets, and management practices—based on ecological wealth and services.

Suggested Citation

  • Scarlett, Lynn & Boyd, James W., 2011. "Ecosystem Services: Quantification, Policy Applications, and Current Federal Capabilities," Discussion Papers dp-11-13, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-11-13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Molly Espey & Santosh Nair, 2005. "Automobile Fuel Economy: What Is It Worth?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 23(3), pages 317-323, July.
    2. Shanjun Li & Christopher Timmins & Roger H. von Haefen, 2009. "How Do Gasoline Prices Affect Fleet Fuel Economy?," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 113-137, August.
    3. Cropper, Maureen L & Deck, Leland B & McConnell, Kenneth E, 1988. "On the Choice of Functional Form for Hedonic Price Functions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(4), pages 668-675, November.
    4. Chugh, Randy & Cropper, Maureen & Narain, Urvashi, 2011. "The cost of fuel economy in the Indian passenger vehicle market," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7174-7183.
    5. Helfand, Gloria & Wolverton, Ann, 2011. "Evaluating the Consumer Response to Fuel Economy: A Review of the Literature," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 5(2), pages 103-146, May.
    6. Soren T. Anderson & Ryan Kellogg & James M. Sallee & Richard T. Curtin, 2011. "Forecasting Gasoline Prices Using Consumer Surveys," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 110-114, May.
    7. Thomas Klier & Joshua Linn, 2012. "New‐vehicle characteristics and the cost of the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 43(1), pages 186-213, March.
    8. Atkinson, Scott E & Halvorsen, Robert, 1984. "A New Hedonic Technique for Estimating Attribute Demand: An Application to the Demand for Automobile Fuel Efficiency," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(3), pages 417-426, August.
    9. Thomas H. Klier & Joshua Linn, 2009. "The price of gasoline and the demand for fuel economy: evidence from monthly new vehicles sales data," Working Paper Series WP-09-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
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    Cited by:

    1. Presnall, Carrie & López-Hoffman, Laura & Miller, Marc L., 2015. "Adding ecosystem services to environmental impact analyses: More sequins on a “bloated Elvis” or rockin' idea?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 29-38.
    2. Scarlett, Lynn & Boyd, James, 2015. "Ecosystem services and resource management: Institutional issues, challenges, and opportunities in the public sector," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 3-10.
    3. Walls, Margaret & Riddle, Anne, 2012. "Biodiversity, Ecosystem Services, and Land Use: Comparing Three Federal Policies," Discussion Papers dp-12-08, Resources For the Future.
    4. Winthrop, Robert H., 2014. "The strange case of cultural services: Limits of the ecosystem services paradigm," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 208-214.

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    ecosystem services; natural capital; ecosystem-based management;

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