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Monetary Policy Regimes and the Term Structure of Interests Rates with Recursive Utility


  • Tanaka Hiroatsu

    (Federal Reserve Board)


I study how two different monetary policy regimes characterized by their difference in degrees of credibility (a 'commitment' regime, in which the central bank can credibly commit to future policy and a 'discretion' regime, in which it cannot) affect the term structure of interest rates and attempt to evaluate which monetary policy regime seems more consistent with the data on macroeconomic variables and term structure dynamics. To this end, I construct a no-arbitrage affine-term structure model based on a New-Keynesian type micro-foundation. The model is augmented with Epstein-Zin (EZ) preferences, real wage rigidity and a simple central bank optimization problem. A shock structure that exhibits stochastic volatility in long-run risk of TFP growth parsimoniously generates time-varying term premia. The estimation of the model suggests that the assumption of a discretion regime performs better than a commitment regime in terms of quantitatively ÃÂfitting some salient features of the US data on the term structure and the business cycle during the Volcker-Greenspan-Bernanke era. The lack of policy credibility leads to volatile and persistent inflation, which generates volatile expected long-run inflation that is negatively correlated with future continuation values. This is perceived particularly risky by EZ nominal bond holders and results in upward sloping average nominal yields, long-term yield volatility and excess return predictability closer to the magnitude observed in the data while keeping the unconditional volatilities of consumption growth and inflation realistic.

Suggested Citation

  • Tanaka Hiroatsu, 2012. "Monetary Policy Regimes and the Term Structure of Interests Rates with Recursive Utility," 2012 Meeting Papers 557, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed012:557

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hansen, Lars Peter, 1982. "Large Sample Properties of Generalized Method of Moments Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1029-1054, July.
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    3. Mark Gertler & Luca Sala & Antonella Trigari, 2008. "An Estimated Monetary DSGE Model with Unemployment and Staggered Nominal Wage Bargaining," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1713-1764, December.
    4. Yashiv, Eran, 2011. "The Joint Behavior of Hiring and Investment," CEPR Discussion Papers 8237, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. John Geweke, 1999. "Using simulation methods for bayesian econometric models: inference, development,and communication," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 1-73.
    6. Sbordone, Argia M., 2005. "Do expected future marginal costs drive inflation dynamics?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 1183-1197, September.
    7. Faccini, Renato & Millard, Stephen & Zanetti, Francesco, 2011. "Wage rigidities in an estimated DSGE model of the UK labour market," Bank of England working papers 408, Bank of England.
    8. Leonardo Melosi, 2011. "Public's Inflation Expectations and Monetary Policy," 2011 Meeting Papers 1151, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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