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Development Accounting

Author

Listed:
  • Juan Carlos Cordoba
  • Marla Ripoll

Abstract

This paper seeks to device and estimate an accounting framework for international comparison of income that takes into account relevant features of poor countries that are often disregarded in the more traditional single-good, Cobb-Douglas accounting framework. Our framework allows for multiple sectors, namely agriculture, manufacturing and services, as well as the possibility of home production. As poor countries are mainly agricultural and their home production could be potentially large, we consider these two features critical to correctly assess the contribution of factors of production versus TFP. Sectorial production functions can either be Cobb-Douglas with different capital shares, but we also study more general CES production functions. We assess how well a single-good, Cobb-Douglas framework performs compared with ours. We show that the standard framework could significantly downplay the role of factors of production, particularly for poor countries, if factor shares are significantly different across sectors. Given the critical importance of sectorial factor shares and the poor basis for any calibration, especially for poor countries, we proceed to estimate these and other parameters of the model under different identifying assumptions. The estimation exploits sectorial information on outputs and inputs

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Carlos Cordoba & Marla Ripoll, 2004. "Development Accounting," 2004 Meeting Papers 325, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed004:325
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Patrick Bolton & Xavier Freixas, 2006. "Corporate Finance and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 19(3), pages 829-870.
    2. Bernanke, Ben S. & Gertler, Mark & Gilchrist, Simon, 1999. "The financial accelerator in a quantitative business cycle framework," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 21, pages 1341-1393 Elsevier.
    3. Carlstrom, Charles T & Fuerst, Timothy S, 1997. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 893-910.
    4. Berger, Allen N, 2003. " The Economic Effects of Technological Progress: Evidence from the Banking Industry," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(2), pages 141-176, April.
    5. Ben S. Bernanke & Mark L. Gertler, 1985. "Banking in General Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 1647, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Andolfatto, David, 1996. "Business Cycles and Labor-Market Search," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 112-132, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dietrich Vollrath, 2009. "The dual economy in long-run development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 287-312, December.
    2. Jaime Alonso-Carrera & Xavier Raurich, 2006. "Growth, Sectoral Composition, and the Wealth of Nations," Working Papers 278, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    3. Gollin, Douglas & Parente, Stephen L. & Rogerson, Richard, 2007. "The food problem and the evolution of international income levels," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 1230-1255.
    4. Vollrath, Dietrich, 2009. "How important are dual economy effects for aggregate productivity?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 325-334, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    world income distribution; multi-sectorial models;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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