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Maverick Firms: An Exploratory Analysis of Mortgage Providers in Australia



This paper develops an empirical strategy to measure maverick-like behaviour. It applies the strategy to a dataset that contains interest rates charged by mortgage providers in Australia from January 2003 to October 2006. The Reserve Bank of Australia raised its cash rate five times in this period, which provides a natural setting to observe suppliers� responses. We examine suppliers� behaviour both in terms of the rates they charge and the time it takes them to change their rates as a response to a systemic increase in costs. These empirical observations suggest that the development of a theory for maverick behaviour be focused on dynamic, asymmetric models and informed by institutions and market dynamics that are relevant to the case at hand.

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  • Robert Breunig & Flavio Menezes, 2007. "Maverick Firms: An Exploratory Analysis of Mortgage Providers in Australia," Discussion Papers Series 348, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:348

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    1. Johnston, David W. & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2009. "Comparing subjective and objective measures of health: Evidence from hypertension for the income/health gradient," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 540-552, May.
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    5. Neeraj Kaushal & Robert Kaestner & Cordelia Reimers, 2007. "Labor Market Effects of September 11th on Arab and Muslim Residents of the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
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    7. Fuchs, Victor R., 2004. "Reflections on the socio-economic correlates of health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 653-661, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Kurschilgen & Alexander Morell & Ori Weisel, 2016. "Internal conflict, market uniformity, and transparency in price competition between teams," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2016_18, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    2. Owen Phillips & Dale Menkhaus & John Thurow, 2011. "The Small Firm in a Quantity Choosing Game: Some Experimental Evidence," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 38(2), pages 191-207, March.

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