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Culture, Conflict and Community: Rituals of Protest or Flairs of Competition

Author

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  • Steven J. Tepper

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

This paper examines the incident of public conflict over artistic and cultural expression in 48 U.S. cities. Analysis of more than 500 cases of conflict reveals that levels of public dispute are related to several underlying structural characteristics of cities. In particular, rapid demographic shifts, especially changes in foreign-born residents, are related to higher levels of conflict. The paper also suggests that there are at least three different profiles of conflict -- there are highly contentious cities, where both liberal-based and conservative-based groups are actively involved in protests; there are cities that experience cultural conflict as identity politics (liberal-based groups are most active); and those cities that practice cultural regulation (conservative-based groups are most active).

Suggested Citation

  • Steven J. Tepper, 2002. "Culture, Conflict and Community: Rituals of Protest or Flairs of Competition," Working Papers 41, Princeton University, School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:cpanda:23
    as

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    File URL: https://culturalpolicy.princeton.edu/sites/culturalpolicy/files/wp23_-_tepper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Becky Pettit & Paul DiMaggio, 1999. "Public Opinion and Political Vulnerability: Why Has the National Endowment for the Arts Been Such an Attractive Target?," Working Papers 55, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies..
    2. repec:pri:cpanda:wp07%20-%20dimaggio%20and%20petit is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Becky Pettit & Paul DiMaggio, 1999. "Public Opinion and Political Vulnerability: Why Has the National Endowment for the Arts Been Such an Attractive Target?," Working Papers 55, Princeton University, School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies..
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Z11 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economics of the Arts and Literature

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