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Decision-Making: A Neuroeconomic Perspective

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  • Hardy-Vallee, Benoit

Abstract

This article introduces and discusses from a philosophical point of view the nascent field of neuroeconomics, which is the study of neural mechanisms involved in decision-making and their economic significance. Following a survey of the ways in which decision-making is usually construed in philosophy, economics and psychology, I review many important findings in neuroeconomics to show that they suggest a revised picture of decision-making and ourselves as choosing agents. Finally, I outline a neuroeconomic account of irrationality.

Suggested Citation

  • Hardy-Vallee, Benoit, 2007. "Decision-Making: A Neuroeconomic Perspective," MPRA Paper 4010, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:4010
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4010/1/MPRA_paper_4010.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    neuroeconomics; decision-making; rationality; ultimatum; philosophy; psychology;

    JEL classification:

    • B50 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - General
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles

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