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Social and economic implications of HIV/AIDS: evidence from West Bengal


  • Sarker, Debnarayan


Based on household level’ field survey in West Bengal State in Indian context, this study suggests that poverty and lower level of human capital provide the basic initiatives for both rural –urban migration and risky occupational choice for household’s income, and thus contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. Also, the HIV/AIDS epidemic of those economically and socially disadvantaged households leads to the consequence of absolute economic and social poverty within a short period after its detection. Despite such a consequence of absolute economic and social poverty, the benefit of actions by government or non-government organizations is insignificant for them

Suggested Citation

  • Sarker, Debnarayan, 2011. "Social and economic implications of HIV/AIDS: evidence from West Bengal," MPRA Paper 33648, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33648

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Joel Sobel, 2002. "Can We Trust Social Capital?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 139-154, March.
    2. Morris, Morris David, 1982. "Poverty and Famines: An Essay on Entitlement and Deprivation. By Amartya Sen. New York: The Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1981. Pp. xii, 257. $17.95," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(04), pages 989-991, December.
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    More about this item


    Socio-economic reasons; Socio-economic implications; Benefit of actions; Rural-Urban Migration; Economically ; Socially disadvantaged households;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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