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New product development in business to business marketing - a relational perspective


  • Filip, Alina


Market position and long-term competitive advantages are dependent on companies’ ability to innovate and their capacity to launch new product or services. This paper aims to highlight the features of product development processes in business to business markets. The research method consisted of a documentary study in the literature and the results focus on the stages involved in the development and launch of a new product. In recent years, statistics have shown an increase in the rate of failure in launching new products on business markets. This has been caused by an inadequate planning and has negative consequences on both customer relationships and organizational economic performance. Given this reality, academics propose a sequential product development plan based on the following essential steps: identifying opportunities and generating ideas, selection of ideas with the highest chances of success, development of new product concept materialized in the form of a prototype, technical testing and acceptance testing, making the final changes to the product, establishing brand name, price level and other intangible elements of the product, legal protection of the product, placing the product into production and effectively lunching the product though a tactical marketing program. Practical experiences show that omission of one or more stages of this process can cause product failure, companies recording a low level of performance, below expected levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Filip, Alina, 2011. "New product development in business to business marketing - a relational perspective," MPRA Paper 31597, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:31597

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Martin C. McGuire & Mancur Olson Jr., 1996. "The Economics of Autocracy and Majority Rule: The Invisible Hand and the Use of Force," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 72-96, March.
    2. Meltzer, Allan H & Richard, Scott F, 1981. "A Rational Theory of the Size of Government," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 914-927, October.
    3. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alina Filip & Lelia Voinea, 2012. "Understanding the Processes of Customer Acquisition, Customer Retention and Customer Relationship Development," International Journal of Economic Practices and Theories, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 2(2), pages 62-67, April.

    More about this item


    Product development; business to business relationships; planning; ideas selection; marketing tests; product failure.;

    JEL classification:

    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing

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