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Human Deprivation Index: A Measure of Multidimensional Poverty


  • Sivakumar, Marimuthu
  • Sarvalingam, A


Poverty is multidimensional in nature. Poverty is associated not only with insufficient income or consumption but also with insufficient outcomes with respect to health, nutrition, and literacy and deficient social relations, insecurity, and low self-esteem and powerlessness. Since poverty is a multidimensional phenomenon, measurement of poverty must cover many dimensions. So far, the income and/or consumption indicator has received most attention. But, now the focus is shifted towards deprivation in different dimensions for example income, health and education. The human development and human deprivation studies have opened new perspectives on measuring and analysing poverty and development with the help of multidimensional concept. The present study, in this context will serve to enrich useful knowledge about human deprivation which analysis the poverty multi dimensionally.

Suggested Citation

  • Sivakumar, Marimuthu & Sarvalingam, A, 2010. "Human Deprivation Index: A Measure of Multidimensional Poverty," MPRA Paper 22337, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:22337

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Human Deprivation; Poverty; Multi dimension; Health; Infant Mortality; Education; Illiteracy; India;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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