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The origins of American industrial success: Evidence from the US portland cement industry

  • Prentice, David

The contributions of innovations, factor endowments and institutions to American industrialization are examined through analysing the rise of the American portland cement industry. Minerals abundance contributed in multiple ways to the spectacular rise of the industry from the 1890s. However, the results of a structural econometric analysis of entry suggests geological surveys, institutions highlighted by David and Wright, played a contributing rather than critical role in the American portland cement industry overcoming incumbent European portland cement and American natural cement producers.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/13409/1/MPRA_paper_13409.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 13409.

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Date of creation: 26 Jun 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13409
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  1. Gavin Wright, 1997. "Can a Nation Learn? American Technology as a Network Phenomenon," Working Papers 98001, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  2. Douglas A. Irwin, 2003. "Explaining America's Surge in Manufactured Exports, 1880-1913," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(2), pages 364-376, May.
  3. Michael L. Tushman & Lori Rosenkopf, 1996. "Executive Succession, Strategic Reorientation and Performance Growth: A Longitudinal Study in the U.S. Cement Industry," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 42(7), pages 939-953, July.
  4. Ciarns, Robert D & Lasserre, Pierre, 1986. " Sectoral Supply of Minerals of Varying Quality," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(4), pages 605-26.
  5. Thomas, Duncan & Strauss, John & Henriques, Maria-Helena, 1990. "Child survival, height for age and household characteristics in Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 197-234, October.
  6. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-61, May.
  7. Harry F. Campbell, 1980. "The Effect of Capital Intensity on the Optimal Rate of Extraction of a Mineral Deposit," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 13(2), pages 349-56, May.
  8. Anderson, Philip & Tushman, Michael L, 2001. "Organizational Environments and Industry Exit: The Effects of Uncertainty, Munificence and Complexity," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 675-711, September.
  9. Slade, Margaret E., 1988. "Grade selection under uncertainty: Least cost last and other anomalies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 189-205, June.
  10. Rosenbaum, David I. & Sukharomana, Supachat, 2001. "Oligopolistic pricing over the deterministic market demand cycle: some evidence from the US Portland cement industry," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 863-884, May.
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