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Economic and Technical Analysis of Ethanol Dry Milling: MOdel User's Manual


  • Rhys T. Dale


  • Wallce E. Tyner

    () (Department of Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture, Purdue University)


Using the DM model is not complex: the user changes input values of interest (plant size, conversion rates, etc.) and examines the effect of these changes on output values (annual profits, feed stock requirements, etc.). There are nine worksheets in four modules in the excel workbook- assumptions, process, economics, and technology assessment. All user inputs are entered in the assumptions module of the model, which consists of three worksheets denoted with bright yellow tabs: process assumptions, economic assumptions and physical assumptions. The values that are entered on this page are then used in each of the subsequent modules to calculate hourly flow rates, equipment size and cost, total costs, loan terms, and annual profits. At the top of each page is a title bar which describes the page, the color coding of the cells, and pertinent information from the other pages. Before each of the pages is discussed, an explanation of the different types of cells in the model is in order.

Suggested Citation

  • Rhys T. Dale & Wallce E. Tyner, 2006. "Economic and Technical Analysis of Ethanol Dry Milling: MOdel User's Manual," Working Papers 06-05, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pae:wpaper:06-05

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Abdoulaye, T. & Lowenberg-DeBoer, J., 2000. "Intensification of Sahelian farming systems: evidence from Niger," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 67-81, May.
    2. Coulibaly, Ousmane & Vitale, Jeffrey D. & Sanders, John H., 1998. "Expected effects of devaluation on cereal production in the Sudanian Region of Mali," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 57(4), pages 489-503, August.
    3. Michael T. Weber & John M. Staatz & Eric W. Crawford & Richard H. Bernsten & John S. Holtzman, 1988. "Informing Food Security Decisions in Africa: Empirical Analysis and Policy Dialogue," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 70(5), pages 1044-1052.
    4. Jeffrey D. Vitale & John H. Sanders, 2005. "New markets and technological change for the traditional cereals in semiarid sub-Saharan Africa: the Malian case," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 111-129, March.
    5. Tahirou Abdoulaye & John H. Sanders, 2005. "Stages and determinants of fertilizer use in semiarid African agriculture: the Niger experience," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 167-179, March.
    6. Rohrbach, David D., 1989. "The Economics of Smallholder Maize Production in Zimbabwe: Implications for Food Security," Food Security International Development Papers 54060, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Sanders, John H., 1989. "Agricultural research and cereal technology introduction in Burkina Faso and Niger," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 139-154.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deverell, Rory & McDonnell, Kevin & Ward, Shane & Devlin, Ger, 2009. "An economic assessment of potential ethanol production pathways in Ireland," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3993-4002, October.

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