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Cooperation in Multiple Spheres of Interaction

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  • Heinrich Harald Nax

Abstract

This note introduces transferable utility cooperative games with multiple membership, extending the scope of cooperative game theory to economic environments featuring externalities and membership in multiple coalitions. This wider class of games generalises games in characteristic and partition function form. definitions of the core for this class of games are proposed, under which cooperation is facilitated through the cross-cutting of contractual arrangements with multiple membership.

Suggested Citation

  • Heinrich Harald Nax, 2008. "Cooperation in Multiple Spheres of Interaction," Economics Series Working Papers 394, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:394
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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/working_papers/paper394.pdf
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cooperative Game Theory; Core; Externalities; Multiple Membership;

    JEL classification:

    • C71 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Cooperative Games
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities

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