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Assessing Polycentric Urban Systems in the OECD: Country, Regional and Metropolitan Perspectives

Author

Listed:
  • Monica Brezzi

    (OECD)

  • Paolo Veneri

    (OECD)

Abstract

Contemporary urban systems in OECD countries are structured around functional regions, which often overcome established city boundaries. Reading space in terms of functional regions allows assessing changes in urban hierarchies and spatial structures, including the polycentricity of urban systems at national, regional and metropolitan scale. By using a harmonised definition of functional urban areas in OECD countries, this paper first provides a sound definition of polycentricity at each spatial scale, highlighting for each of them the different links with policy. Second, it provides measures of polycentricity and explores the economic implications of different spatial structures. Results show that relatively more monocentric regions have higher GDP per capita than their more polycentric counterparts. At country level, on the other hand, polycentricity is associated with higher GDP per capita.

Suggested Citation

  • Monica Brezzi & Paolo Veneri, 2014. "Assessing Polycentric Urban Systems in the OECD: Country, Regional and Metropolitan Perspectives," OECD Regional Development Working Papers 2014/1, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:govaab:2014/1-en
    DOI: 10.1787/5jz5mpdkmvnr-en
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. P. C. Cheshire & E. S. Mills (ed.), 1999. "Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 3, number 3.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    polycentricity; Spatial structure; urban system;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

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