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Monetary Policy Reaction Functions in the OECD

Author

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  • Douglas Sutherland

    (OECD)

Abstract

Monetary policy reaction functions can provide insights into the factors influencing monetary policy decisions. Empirical estimates suggest that differences exist across countries as to whether monetary policy reacts solely to expected inflation or also takes into account expected output developments. A range of other factors, such as monetary policy in large economies, can also influence monetary policy reactions in smaller ones. On the other hand, monetary policy has reacted less to contemporaneous measures of the output gap, while asset price developments do not generally appear to have influenced monetary policy decisions. Les fonctions de réaction de la politique monétaire dans la zone de l'OCDE Les fonctions de réaction de la politique monétaire peuvent utilement éclairer les facteurs qui influent sur les décisions de politique monétaire. Les estimations empiriques montrent qu’il y a des différences d’un pays à l’autre sur le point de savoir si la politique monétaire réagit uniquement à l’inflation anticipée, ou prend également en compte l’évolution prévisible de la production. Plusieurs autres facteurs, notamment la politique monétaire des grandes économies, peut également influer sur les réactions de politique monétaire dans les petites économies. En revanche, la politique monétaire a moins réagi aux mesures instantanées de l’écart de production et l’évolution des prix des actifs ne paraît pas en général avoir influencé les décisions de politique monétaire.

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas Sutherland, 2010. "Monetary Policy Reaction Functions in the OECD," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 761, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:761-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kmfwj7z6d7j-en
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Douglas Sutherland & Peter Hoeller & Balázs Égert & Oliver Röhn, 2010. "Counter-cyclical Economic Policy," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 760, OECD Publishing.
    2. Fabio C. Bagliano & Claudio Morana, 2017. "It ain’t over till it’s over: A global perspective on the Great Moderation-Great Recession interconnection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(49), pages 4946-4969, October.
    3. Imen Mohamed Sghaier & Zouheir Abida, 2013. "Monetary Policy Rules for a Developing Countries: Evidence from Tunisia," The Review of Finance and Banking, Academia de Studii Economice din Bucuresti, Romania / Facultatea de Finante, Asigurari, Banci si Burse de Valori / Catedra de Finante, vol. 5(1), pages 035-046, June.
    4. Aleksandra Halka, 2016. "How the central bank’s reaction function in small open economies evolved during the crisis," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 47(4), pages 301-318.
    5. Umit Bulut, 2016. "How Far Ahead Does the Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey Look?," Journal of Central Banking Theory and Practice, Central bank of Montenegro, vol. 5(1), pages 99-111.
    6. Aleksandra Halka, 2015. "Lessons from the crisis.Did central banks do their homework?," NBP Working Papers 224, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    asset prices; monetary policy; output gap; politique budgétaire; prix des actifs; écart de production;

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System

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