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Saving Trends and Behaviour in OECD Countries

  • Andrew Dean
  • Martine Durand
  • John Fallon
  • Peter Hoeller

National saving ratios are generally lower now than in the 1960s or 1970s. This paper first reviews developments in national and international saving and investment trends in OECD countries since the 1960s. It then examines sectoral saving trends and considers the links between them. There are seen to be important offsets between government and private sector saving and, within the latter, between the business sector and households, so that national and private saving rates tend to be more stable than their component parts. The paper looks in particular at the reasons lying behind the volatile behaviour of household saving in certain countries in recent years ... Les niveaux des taux d'épargne nationaux sont généralement plus bas aujourd'hui que dans les années 60 et 70. Cet article présente les évolutions de l'épargne et de l'investissement dans les pays de l'OCDE depuis les années 60. Il examine ensuite les tendances des taux d'épargne dans les différents secteurs de l'économie et les relations entre les évolutions de ces divers taux. En particulier, il apparait qu'il existe des compensations entre l'épargne publique et l'épargne privée et au sein de l'épargne privée entre l'épargne des entreprises et celle des ménages. Ainsi, les taux d'épargne nationaux et privés ont tendance à être plus stable que leurs composantes. Cet article examine en outre les facteurs explicatifs de l'évolution particulière de l'épargne des ménages dans un certain nombre de pays au cours des dernières années ...

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Paper provided by OECD Publishing in its series OECD Economics Department Working Papers with number 67.

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Date of creation: Jun 1989
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Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:67-en
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