IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nex/wpaper/activityspaces.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Network Structure and Activity Spaces

Author

Listed:
  • Pavithra Parthasarathi
  • Hartwig Hochmair
  • David Levinson

    () (Nexus (Networks, Economics, and Urban Systems) Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota)

Abstract

This research analyzes the influence of network structure on household spatial patterns, as measured by activity spaces. The analysis uses street network and travel survey data from the Twin Cities and South Florida to compile measures of network structure. Statistical regression models test the relationship between network structure and travel. The results show that network design does influence travel, after controlling for other non-network based measures. Results from this analysis can be used to understand how changes in network can be used to bring about desired changes in travel behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Pavithra Parthasarathi & Hartwig Hochmair & David Levinson, 2010. "Network Structure and Activity Spaces," Working Papers 000080, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:activityspaces
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/180053
    File Function: Second version, 2015
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fyhri, Aslak & Hjorthol, Randi & Mackett, Roger L. & Fotel, Trine Nordgaard & Kyttä, Marketta, 2011. "Children's active travel and independent mobility in four countries: Development, social contributing trends and measures," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 703-710, September.
    2. Elias, Wafa & Katoshevski-Cavari, Rachel, 2014. "The role of socio-economic and environmental characteristics in school-commuting behavior: A comparative study of Jewish and Arab children in Israel," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 79-87.
    3. Chandra Bhat & Ram Pendyala, 2005. "Modeling intra-household interactions and group decision-making," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(5), pages 443-448, September.
    4. Raktim Mitra & Guy EJ Faulkner & Ron N Buliung & Michelle R Stone, 2014. "Do parental perceptions of the neighbourhood environment influence children’s independent mobility? Evidence from Toronto, Canada," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 51(16), pages 3401-3419, December.
    5. Chinh Ho & Corinne Mulley, 2015. "Intra-household interactions in transport research: a review," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 33-55, January.
    6. Jen-Jia Lin & Hsiao-Te Chang, 2010. "Built Environment Effects on Children’s School Travel in Taipai: Independence and Travel Mode," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(4), pages 867-889, April.
    7. Zhang, Junyi & Fujiwara, Akimasa, 2006. "Representing household time allocation behavior by endogenously incorporating diverse intra-household interactions: A case study in the context of elderly couples," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 54-74, January.
    8. Amith Yarlagadda & Sivaramakrishnan Srinivasan, 2008. "Modeling children’s school travel mode and parental escort decisions," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 201-218, March.
    9. Fortin, B. & Lacroix, G., 1993. "A Test of the Neoclassical and Collective Models of Household Labour Supply," Papers 9335, Laval - Recherche en Politique Economique.
    10. Zhang, Junyi & Kuwano, Masashi & Lee, Backjin & Fujiwara, Akimasa, 2009. "Modeling household discrete choice behavior incorporating heterogeneous group decision-making mechanisms," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 230-250, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Giacomin & Luke James & David Levinson, 2012. "Trends in Metropolitan Network Circuity," Working Papers 000106, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transportation Geography; Network Structure; Circuity; Accessibility;

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • R53 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Public Facility Location Analysis; Public Investment and Capital Stock

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:activityspaces. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (David Levinson). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nexmnus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.