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A Systematic Banking Collapse in a Perfect Foresight World

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  • Robert P. Flood
  • Peter M. Garber

Abstract

In this paper we present a model in which a systematic banking collapse is possible in a perfect foresight, general equilibrium context. Our aim is to determine con3itions under which a collapse will eventually occur and the timing of such a collapse. The collapse can occur endogenously, driven by market fundamentals. Alternatively, it can be caused by a mass hysteria which generates itself in reality. Vie also compare the assumptions and implications of our model to the observable phenomena of the 1930's.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert P. Flood & Peter M. Garber, 1981. "A Systematic Banking Collapse in a Perfect Foresight World," NBER Working Papers 0691, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:0691
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w0691.pdf
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    1. Flood, Robert P & Garber, Peter M, 1984. "Gold Monetization and Gold Discipline," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(1), pages 90-107, February.
    2. Buyer, Russell S. & Hodrick, Robert J., 1982. "The dynamic adjustment path for perfectly foreseen changes in monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 185-201.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bernanke, Ben S, 1983. "Nonmonetary Effects of the Financial Crisis in Propagation of the Great Depression," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 257-276, June.
    2. Ben Bemanke & Harold James, 1991. "The Gold Standard, Deflation, and Financial Crisis in the Great Depression: An International Comparison," NBER Chapters,in: Financial Markets and Financial Crises, pages 33-68 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. M. Berlemann & K. Hristov & Nikolay Nenovsky, 2002. "Lending of last resort, moral hazard and twin crises. Lessons from the Bulgarian financial crises 1996/1997," Post-Print halshs-00260052, HAL.
    4. François Marini, 1992. "Les fondements micro-économiques du concept de panique bancaire, une introduction," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 43(2), pages 301-326.
    5. Nancy Marion, 1999. "Some Parallels Between Currency and Banking Crises," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 6(4), pages 473-490, November.

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