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Transboundary pollution in the black sea : comparison of institutional arrangements

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Abstract

This paper analyses the transboundary pollution between Romania and Ukraine, coastal states along the Black Sea, and studies the welfare consequences of institutional arrangements for controlling this problem. To achieve this goal, we use a dynamic and strategic framework. We compare in terms of total welfare for two countries a first-best case with three different institutional arrangements : the noncooperative game of countries, the uniform emission policy and the constant emission policy as proposed by the Black Sea Commission. Our findings indicate that the noncooperative game provides a better level of total welfare than the other rules.

Suggested Citation

  • Basak Bayramoglu, 2004. "Transboundary pollution in the black sea : comparison of institutional arrangements," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques v04020, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:wpsorb:v04020
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles F Mason, 2017. "Climate Change and Migration: A Dynamic Model," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 421-444.
    2. Lassi Ahlvik & Yulia Pavlova, 2013. "A Strategic Analysis of Eutrophication Abatement in the Baltic Sea," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 56(3), pages 353-378, November.
    3. Zhao, Laijun & Li, Changmin & Huang, Rongbing & Si, Steven & Xue, Jian & Huang, Wei & Hu, Yue, 2013. "Harmonizing model with transfer tax on water pollution across regional boundaries in a China’s lake basin," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 225(2), pages 377-382.
    4. Charles F. Mason, 2017. "Transboundary Externalities and Reciprocal Taxes: A Differential Game Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 6561, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Victoria I Mumanskaya & Charles F Mason & Edward B Barbier, 2012. "Trade, Transboundary, Pollution, and Foreign Lobbying," OxCarre Working Papers 071, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Black Sea; dynamic games; environment; institutional arrangements; noncooperative games; transboundary pollution; water.;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

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