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Mechanisms behind Substance Abuse and Rugby. Lessons from a Field Experiment with Incarcerated Offenders

Author

Listed:
  • Alejandro Cid

    ()

  • Alexander Castleton

Abstract

There are a broad range of rehabilitation programs but results differ significantly among them, from positive to no-effect programs –and even to negative-effect programs. Hence, in order to guide policy, it is necessary to find out the features that should be present in programs for inmates to guarantee positive effects. We used a random assignment to evaluate an innovative rehabilitation program –rugby classes offered by players of the national team- for incarcerated offenders in an overcrowded prison in Uruguay. We find the program positively influences inmates’ behavior, lowering the consumption of drugs. Also, studying the mechanisms behind these findings, our results suggest that the program fosters healthier conduct and positive social attitudes. After studying the criminogenic attitudes addressed by this rugby program, we suggest lines for policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Alejandro Cid & Alexander Castleton, 2012. "Mechanisms behind Substance Abuse and Rugby. Lessons from a Field Experiment with Incarcerated Offenders," Documentos de Trabajo/Working Papers 1201, Facultad de Ciencias Empresariales y Economia. Universidad de Montevideo..
  • Handle: RePEc:mnt:wpaper:1201
    as

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    File URL: http://www.um.edu.uy/docs/working_paper_um_cee_2012_01.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Alain Cohn & Michel André Maréchal & Thomas Noll, 2015. "Bad Boys: How Criminal Identity Salience Affects Rule Violation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(4), pages 1289-1308.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    prison; rehabilitation; impact evaluation; randomized experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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