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Student Enrolment and Faculty Recruitment in Ontario: The Double Cohort, the Baby Boom Echo, and the Aging of University Faculty


  • Byron G. Spencer


The recent restructuring of the Ontario secondary school system means that two graduating classes the so-called "double cohort" will compete for admission to the universities in the fall of 2003. Unless admission standards are raised to restrict enrolment, the sheer numbers involved will place extraordinary demands on the system for half a decade. The demands will be difficult to accommodate, not least because more than half of current faculty are over the age of 50, and most will retire in this decade. Working with the latest available numbers, this paper provides projections to show the impact that the double cohort will have on student numbers, faculty requirements, and the need to recruit new faculty.

Suggested Citation

  • Byron G. Spencer, 2002. "Student Enrolment and Faculty Recruitment in Ontario: The Double Cohort, the Baby Boom Echo, and the Aging of University Faculty," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 373, McMaster University.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcm:qseprr:373

    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Tomz, Michael & Wittenberg, Jason & King, Gary, 2003. "Clarify: Software for Interpreting and Presenting Statistical Results," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 8(i01).
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    4. Jeremiah Hurley & Nancy Arbuthnot Johnson, 1991. "The Effects of Co-payments within Drug Reimbursement Programs," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 17(4), pages 473-489, December.
    5. Coulson, N Edward, et al, 1995. "Estimating the Moral-Hazard Effect of Supplemental Medical Insurance in the Demand for Prescription Drugs by the Elderly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 122-126, May.
    6. Stephen Smith & Sheila Watson, 1990. "Modelling the effects of prescription charge rises," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 11(1), pages 75-91, February.
    7. Leibowitz, Arleen & Manning, Willard G. & Newhouse, Joseph P., 1985. "The demand for prescription drugs as a function of cost-sharing," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 21(10), pages 1063-1069, January.
    8. O'Brien, Bernie, 1989. "The effect of patient charges on the utilisation of prescription medicines," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 109-132, March.
    9. Street, Andrew & Jones, Andrew & Furuta, Aya, 1999. "Cost-sharing and pharmaceutical utilisation and expenditure in Russia," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 459-472, August.
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    More about this item


    student enrolment; faculty recruitment; aging;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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