IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Labor Market Imperfections and the Dynamics of Postwar Business Cycles


  • Steve Ambler
  • Alain Guay
  • Louis Phaneuf


An estimated dynamic general equilibrium model which features imperfectly competititve households, sticky nominal wages and costly labor input adjustment is shown to be consistent with several stylized aspects of U.S. postwar business cycle dynamics including the positive serial correlation of output, consumption, investment and employment growth over short horizons and the persistent, hump-shaped response of output to innovations in the temporary component.

Suggested Citation

  • Steve Ambler & Alain Guay & Louis Phaneuf, 2003. "Labor Market Imperfections and the Dynamics of Postwar Business Cycles," Cahiers de recherche 0319, CIRPEE.
  • Handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:0319

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Uri Gneezy & Jan Potters, 1997. "An Experiment on Risk Taking and Evaluation Periods," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 631-645.
    2. Shlomo Benartzi & Richard H. Thaler, 1995. "Myopic Loss Aversion and the Equity Premium Puzzle," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(1), pages 73-92.
    3. Michael S. Haigh & John A. List, 2005. "Do Professional Traders Exhibit Myopic Loss Aversion? An Experimental Analysis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(1), pages 523-534, February.
    4. Uri Gneezy & Arie Kapteyn & Jan Potters, 2003. "Evaluation Periods and Asset Prices in a Market Experiment," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 58(2), pages 821-838, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Fève, Patrick & Matheron, Julien, 2005. "Can the Kydland-Prescott Model Pass the Cogley-Nason Test?," IDEI Working Papers 350, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    2. Nooman Rebei & Steven Ambler & Ali Dib, 2004. "Optimal Taylor Rules in an Estimated Model of a Small Open Economy," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 627, Econometric Society.
    3. Nooman Rebei, 2004. "Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Fiscal Shocks in a Small Open Economy," Staff Working Papers 04-41, Bank of Canada.
    4. Louis Phaneuf & Nooman Rebei, 2007. "Technology Shocks and Business Cycles: The Role of Processing Stages and Nominal Rigidities," Staff Working Papers 07-7, Bank of Canada.
    5. Kevin Moran, 2005. "Learning and the Welfare Implications of Changing Inflation Targets," Cahiers de recherche 0511, CIRPEE.
    6. Steve Ambler & Ali Dib & Nooman Rebei, 2003. "Nominal Rigidities and Exchange Rate Pass-Through in a Structural Model of a Small Open Economy," Staff Working Papers 03-29, Bank of Canada.
    7. Louis Phaneuf & Nooman Rebei, 2008. "Production Stages and the Transmission of Technological Progress," Cahiers de recherche 0802, CIRPEE.
    8. Chahnez Boudaya, 2006. "Stage-specific technology shocks and employment : Could we reconcile with the RBC models ?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00115791, HAL.
    9. Alexopoulos, Michelle, 2007. "A monetary business cycle model with unemployment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 3904-3940, December.

    More about this item


    Imperfectly competitive households; Sticky nominal wages; Labor adjustment costs; Business cycles; Endogenous propagation mechanisms;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:0319. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Manuel Paradis). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.