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Global Imbalances, the U.S. Dollar, and How the Crisis at the Core of Global Finance Spread to "Self-insuring" Emerging Market Economies

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  • Jorg Bibow

Abstract

This paper investigates the spread of what started as a crisis at the core of the global financial system to emerging economies. While emerging economies had exhibited some resilience through the early stages of the financial turmoil that began in the summer of 2007, they have been hit hard since mid-2008. Their deteriorating fortunes are only partly attributable to the collapse in world trade and sharp drop in commodity prices. Things were made worse by emerging markets' exposure to the turmoil in global finance itself. As "innocent bystanders," even countries that had taken out "self-insurance" proved vulnerable to the global "sudden stop" in capital flows. We critique loanable funds theoretical interpretations of global imbalances and offer an alternative explanation that emphasizes the special status of the U.S. dollar. Instead of taking out even more self-insurance, developing countries should pursue capital account management to enlarge their policy space and reduce external vulnerabilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Jorg Bibow, 2010. "Global Imbalances, the U.S. Dollar, and How the Crisis at the Core of Global Finance Spread to "Self-insuring" Emerging Market Economies," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_591, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_591
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    Cited by:

    1. Hasan Cömert & Esra Nur Uğurlu, 2015. "The Impacts of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis on Developing Countries: The Case of the 15 Most Affected Countries," ERC Working Papers 1509, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Oct 2015.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Crisis; Capital Flows; Self-insurance; Capital Controls; Bretton Woods II Hypothesis; Global Saving Glut Hypothesis;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

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