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A Survey of the Effects of the Minimum Wage in Latin America


  • Sara Lemos



The available empirical minimum wage literature, which is mostly based on US evidence, is not very useful for analyzing developing countries, where the minimum wage affects many more workers and labour institutions and law enforcement differ in important ways. The main contribution of this paper is to survey the existing minimum wage literature for Latin America. [This paper is a reproduction of Chapter 1 of Lemos' doctorate thesis, available at the library collection of the University College London. This paper contains a survey of studies available until 2003.]

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Lemos, 2007. "A Survey of the Effects of the Minimum Wage in Latin America," Discussion Papers in Economics 07/04, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:07/4

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:135-157 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sara Wong, 2017. "Minimum wage impacts on wages and hours worked of low-income workers in Ecuador," Working Papers PMMA 2017-14, PEP-PMMA.
    3. Fabio Sánchez & Valentina Duque & Mauricio Ruíz, 2009. "Costos laborales y no laborales y su impacto sobre el desempleo, la duración del desempleo y la informalidad en Colombia, 1980-2007," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 005540, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.

    More about this item


    minimum wage; wage effect; employment effect; price effect; informal sector; cost shock;

    JEL classification:

    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy

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