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The Effect of Unconventional Monetary Policy on the Macro Economy: Evidence from Japan's Quantitative Easing Policy Period


  • Masahiko Shibamoto

    (Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration (RIEB), Kobe University, Japan)

  • Minoru Tachibana

    (School of Economics, Osaka Prefecture University, Japan)


This paper assesses the effectiveness of unonventional monetary policy on the macro ecnomy. It focuses on the Japanese economy during the Bank of Japan's quantitative easing policy period, and analyzes the effects of monetary policy shocks and systematic monetary policy using the vector autoregression model with simultaneous interaction between stock prices and policy decisions. The main finding is that unconventional monetary policy has a significant effect on the macro economy, which is closely in line with the existing evidence under the conventional monetary policy setting. The output effects work through the transmission linking the stock market and the real economy, while it plays a limited role in terms of the price effects. The analysis also suggests that the Bank of Japan's systematic policy responses mitigate severe downward pressure on the real economy generated from the stock market.

Suggested Citation

  • Masahiko Shibamoto & Minoru Tachibana, 2013. "The Effect of Unconventional Monetary Policy on the Macro Economy: Evidence from Japan's Quantitative Easing Policy Period," Discussion Paper Series DP2013-12, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2013-12

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Masahiko Shibamoto, 2016. "Source of Underestimation of the Monetary Policy Effect: Re-Examination of the Policy Effectiveness in Japan's 1990s," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 84(6), pages 795-810, December.
    2. MIYAO Ryuzo & OKIMOTO Tatsuyoshi, 2017. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Japan's Unconventional Monetary Policies," Discussion papers 17065, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Masahiko Shibamoto, 2016. "Empirical Assessment of the Impact of Monetary Policy Communication on the Financial Market," Discussion Paper Series DP2016-19, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.

    More about this item


    Unconventional monetary policy; Vector autoregression model; Interaction between monetary policy and stock market; Effects of monetary policy shocks; Systematic monetary policy responses;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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