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Why Remit? The Case of Nicaragua

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  • Naufal, George S

    () (Texas A&M University)

Abstract

In the last two decades remittances have gained interest due to their large size. For several developing countries remittances constitute a large portion of their GDP and sometimes exceed FDI. While FDIs are usually profit driven, it is not clear what the driving force behind remittances is. This paper presents a simple theoretical model of migrants' remitting behavior. I consider two general motivations for remitting: altruism and self-interest. Using a heteroskedastic Tobit with a known form of variance I test the findings of the theoretical model with data from Nicaragua. Evidence suggests that migrants from Nicaragua remit for altruistic reasons. Moreover some gender heterogeneity seems to exist in the remitting behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Naufal, George S, 2008. "Why Remit? The Case of Nicaragua," IZA Discussion Papers 3276, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3276
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Knowles, James C. & Anker, Richard, 1981. "An analysis of income transfers in a developing country : The case of Kenya," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 205-226, April.
    2. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bettin, Giulia & Lucchetti, Riccardo & Zazzaro, Alberto, 2012. "Endogeneity and sample selection in a model for remittances," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 370-384.
    2. Yaw Nyarko, 2014. "The Returns to the Brain Drain and Brain Circulation in Sub-Saharan Africa: Some Computations Using Data from Ghana," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume II: Human Capital, pages 305-345 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Andrew W. Hobbs & Kenneth P. Jameson, 2012. "Measuring the effect of bi-directional migration remittances on poverty and inequality in Nicaragua," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(19), pages 2451-2460, July.
    4. repec:nbr:nberch:13368 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti & Alberto Zazzaro, 2009. "Income, consumption and remittances: evidence from immigrants to Australia," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 34, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    6. Simon Davies, 2011. "What Motivates Gifts? Intra-Family Transfers in Rural Malawi," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 473-492, September.
    7. Maria Amparo Cruz-Saco & Mónika López-Anuarbe, 2013. "Familism and Social Inclusion: Hispanics in New London, Connecticut," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 1(2), pages 113-125.
    8. Farai Jena, 2016. "The remittance behaviour of Kenyan sibling migrants," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-19, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    altruism; censored regression; remittances; Central America; Nicaragua;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers

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