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Offal Trade in the United States and the European Community: Consumption Patterns, Valorization, Hormone Use, and Policy Projections (The)


  • Hayes, Dermot J.


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  • Hayes, Dermot J., 1989. "Offal Trade in the United States and the European Community: Consumption Patterns, Valorization, Hormone Use, and Policy Projections (The)," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10941, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:10941

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Badiane, Ousmane & Kinteh, Sambouh, 1994. "Trade pessimism and regionalism in African countries: the case of groundnut exporters," Research reports 97, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Gary Adams & Patrick Westhoff & Brian Willott & Robert E. Young, 2001. "Do “Decoupled” Payments Affect U.S. Crop Area? Preliminary Evidence from 1997–2000," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1190-1195.
    3. Beghin, John C. & Roland-Holst, David & Van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique, 2002. "How Will Agricultural Trade Reforms in High-Income Countries Affect the Trading Relationships of Developing Countries?," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10665, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. John C. Beghin & Jean-Christophe Bureau & Sophie Drogué, 2003. "Calibration of Incomplete Demand Systems in Quantitative Analysis, The," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 03-wp324, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    5. Thurman, Walter N. & Chvosta, Jan & Brown, Blake A. & Rucker, Randal R., 2003. "The End Of Supply Controls: The Economic Effects Of Recent Change In Federal Peanut Policy," 2003 Annual Meeting, February 1-5, 2003, Mobile, Alabama 35041, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. John C. Beghin & Holger Matthey, 2003. "Modeling World Peanut Product Markets: A Tool for Agricultural Trade Policy Analysis," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 03-wp332, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    7. Tsunehiro Otsuki & John S. Wilson, 2001. "What price precaution? European harmonisation of aflatoxin regulations and African groundnut exports," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 28(3), pages 263-284, October.
    8. Akobundu, Eberechukwu & Norton, George W. & Gaye, Matar & Bertelsen, Michael, 1998. "Farm-Household Analysis Of Policies Affecting Peanut Production In Senegal," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20887, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Rucker, Randal R & Thurman, Walter N, 1990. "The Economic Effects of Supply Controls: The Simple Analytics of the U.S. Peanut Program," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 483-515, October.
    10. Beghin, John C. & Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Drogue, Sophie, 2003. "The Calibration Of Incomplete Demand Systems In Quantitative Analysis," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25820, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Ibrahima Hathie & Rigoberto A. Lopez, 2002. "The impact of market reforms on the Senegalese peanut economy," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(5), pages 543-554.
    12. Diop, Ndiame & Beghin, John & Sewadeh, Mirvat, 2004. "Groundnut policies, global trade dynamics, and the impact of trade liberalization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3226, The World Bank.
    13. Bernard Hoekman & Francis Ng & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2004. "Agricultural Tariffs or Subsidies: Which Are More Important for Developing Economies?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(2), pages 175-204.
    14. John Beghin & Jean-Christophe Bureau & Sophie Drogue, 2004. "Calibration of incomplete demand systems in quantitative analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(8), pages 839-847.
    15. Baffes, John, 2004. "Cotton : Market setting, trade policies, and issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3218, The World Bank.
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