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Zur Logik betrieblicher Qualifizierungsstrategien im internationalen Vergleich

Author

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  • Uschi Backes-Gellner

    () (Institute for Strategy and Business Economics, University of Zurich)

Abstract

Der Beitrag untersucht theoretisch und empirisch, inwiefern betriebliche Qualifizierungsstrategien auf der Basis eines Modells zur optimalen Vorratshaltung erklärt werden können. Demnach müsste ein positiver Zusammenhang beobachtbar sein zwischen betrieblichen Qualifikationsanstrengungen und den durch die Absatzmarktbedingungen getriebenen Fehlmengenkosten einer zu geringen Ausstattung mit qualifiziertem Personal (z.B. Konventionalstrafen bei Terminüberziehung oder Abwanderung von Kunden bei schlechter Produkt- oder Servicequalität). Außerdem müsste sich ein signifikanter Zusammenhang zwischen betrieblichen Qualifizierungsanstrengungen und der Verteilung des Qualifikationsbedarfs, also dem Produktionsregime nachweisen lassen, wobei auf der einen Seite Unternehmen mit Massenproduktion wenig Qualifikationsanstrengungen und auf der anderen Seite Unternehmen mit flexibilisierter und qualitätsorientierter Produktion hohe Qualifikationsanstrengungen vorzuweisen haben sollten. Außerdem hängen die Qualifizierungsanstrengungen von den sogenannten Einstandskosten ab, d.h. den Kosten der Bereitstellung qualifizierter Facharbeiter. unterscheiden lassen. Die Hypothesen werden untersucht basierend auf ländervergleichenden Fallstudien mit mehr als 80 paarweise vergleichbaren Unternehmen aus vier Branchen. Die empirischen Befunde untermauern alle Hypothesen. Es zeigt sich, dass das Ausmaß der Qualifizierung wesentlich von den Absatzmarkt- und Produktionsstrategien getrieben ist und dass der Weg im Wesentlichen von länderspezifischen Unterschieden in den Kosten der Bereitstellung qualifizierter Facharbeiter determiniert ist.

Suggested Citation

  • Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2008. "Zur Logik betrieblicher Qualifizierungsstrategien im internationalen Vergleich," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0020, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0020
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    File URL: http://repec.business.uzh.ch/RePEc/iso/leadinghouse/0020_lhwpaper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Samuel Muehlemann & Stefan C. Wolter, 2006. "Regional Effects on Employer Provided Training: Evidence from Apprenticeship Training in Switzerland," CESifo Working Paper Series 1665, CESifo Group Munich.
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    3. Bassanini, Andrea & Brunello, Giorgio, 2011. "Barriers to entry, deregulation and workplace training: A theoretical model with evidence from Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1152-1176.
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    8. Katja Görlitz & Joel Stiebale, 2011. "The Impact of Product Market Competition on Employers’ Training Investments. Evidence from German Establishment Panel Data," De Economist, Springer, vol. 159(1), pages 1-23, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:iab:iabzaf:v:40:i:2/3:p:221-233 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Zwick, Thomas, 2007. "Apprenticeship training in Germany - investment or productivity driven?," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 40(2/3), pages 193-204.
    3. repec:iab:iabzaf:v:40:i:2/3:p:193-204 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dietrich, Hans & Gerner, Hans-Dieter, 2007. "The determinants of apprenticeship training with particular reference to business expectations," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 40(2/3), pages 221-233.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Further training; investment in human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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