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Why Do People Buy Lottery Products?

Author

Listed:
  • Horácio Faustino
  • Maria João Kaiseler
  • Rafael Marques

Abstract

This paper examines the lottery sales of 99 countries by type of product in order to analyze the socioeconomic and demographic features that help to explain gambling consumption around the world. With a panel data analysis covering 13 years, this study explains the variation of a country’s per-capita lottery sales in general and by type of game: lotto, numbers, keno, toto, draw and instant. This paper found that the richer countries spend more than the poorer countries and the income elasticity of the demand for lottery products is greater than one. So, we may assert that there is an implicit progressivity tax in games when we consider countries rather than households. Several studies have also revealed an inverse relationship between education and the consumption of lottery products. This paper confirms this hypothesis for lotteries in general, but not for the specific lottery products.

Suggested Citation

  • Horácio Faustino & Maria João Kaiseler & Rafael Marques, 2009. "Why Do People Buy Lottery Products?," Working Papers Department of Economics 2009/01, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
  • Handle: RePEc:ise:isegwp:wp12009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Giacopassi & Mark W. Nichols & B. Grant Stitt, 2006. "Voting for a Lottery," Public Finance Review, , vol. 34(1), pages 80-100, January.
    2. Rubenstein, Ross & Scafidi, Benjamin, 2002. "Who Pays and Who Benefits? Examining the Distributional Consequences of the Georgia Lottery for Education," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 55(N. 2), pages 223-238, June.
    3. Charles T. Clotfelter & Philip J. Cook, 1989. "The Demand for Lottery Products," NBER Working Papers 2928, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Garrett, Thomas A. & Sobel, Russell S., 1999. "Gamblers favor skewness, not risk: Further evidence from United States' lottery games," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 85-90, April.
    5. Clotfelter, Charles T & Cook, Philip J, 1990. "On the Economics of State Lotteries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 105-119, Fall.
    6. Rubenstein, Ross & Scafidi, Benjamin, 2002. "Who Pays and Who Benefits? Examining the Distributional Consequences of the Georgia Lottery for Education," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 55(2), pages 223-238, June.
    7. Charles T. Clotfelter & Philip J. Cook, 1987. "Implicit Taxation in Lottery Finance," NBER Working Papers 2246, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gambling; Lotteries; Religiosity; Education; Culture; Age; Panel Data.;

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