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Transport Policies in Latin America


  • Enrique Ide Carvallo
  • Pedro Lizana


The issues of air pollution and traffic congestion in Latin America have been growing increasingly important since the end of the 20th century. The latter may help explain why several cities around the continent have tried different combination of public policies with vary-ing degrees of success. We describe the policies that outline the Latin American experience in this matter and hope to be a useful reference to subsequent research in the area.

Suggested Citation

  • Enrique Ide Carvallo & Pedro Lizana, 2011. "Transport Policies in Latin America," Documentos de Trabajo 408, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  • Handle: RePEc:ioe:doctra:408

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    12. Caffera, Marcelo, 2011. "The use of economic instruments for pollution control in Latin America: lessons for future policy design," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(03), pages 247-273, June.
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    More about this item


    Transport policies; driving restrictions; public transport; air pollution; car use;

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling


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