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Investigating the Determinants of Banking Coexceedances in Europe in the Summer of 2008

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  • Brian Lucey* School of Business and Institute for International Integration Studies,Trinity College Dublin Aleksandar Ševic, School of Business, Trinity College Dublin

Abstract

We examine the nature, extent and possible causes of bank contagion in a high frequency setting. Looking at six major European banks in the summer and autumn of 2008, we model the lower coexceedances of these banks returns. We find that market microstructure, volatility (measured by range based measures) and limited general market conditions are key determinants of these coexceedances. We find some evidence that herding occurred.

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  • Brian Lucey* School of Business and Institute for International Integration Studies,Trinity College Dublin Aleksandar Ševic, School of Business, Trinity College Dublin, 2009. "Investigating the Determinants of Banking Coexceedances in Europe in the Summer of 2008," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp301, IIIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp301
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    1. repec:eee:finana:v:55:y:2018:i:c:p:35-49 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Chouliaras, Andreas & Grammatikos, Theoharry, 2013. "News Flow, Web Attention and Extreme Returns in the European Financial Crisis," MPRA Paper 51335, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Fiordelisi, Franco & Soana, Maria-Gaia & Schwizer, Paola, 2013. "The determinants of reputational risk in the banking sector," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1359-1371.
    4. Apostolos Thomadakis, 2012. "Measuring Financial Contagion with Extreme Coexceedances," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1112, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    5. Chouliaras, Andreas & Grammatikos, Theoharry, 2014. "Extreme Returns in the European Financial Crisis," MPRA Paper 58978, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Dewandaru, Ginanjar & Masih, Rumi & Masih, A. Mansur M., 2016. "What can wavelets unveil about the vulnerabilities of monetary integration? A tale of Eurozone stock markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 981-996.

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