IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

What Went Right in Japan


  • Adam S. Posen

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)


Japan is in a strong recovery. Real GDP growth will exceed 4 percent in 2004 and likely be 3 percent or higher in 2005 and perhaps even 2006. The economy also grew solidly between 2003Q1 and 2004Q2 at an average real annualized rate of 3.2 percent. The pace is sustainable, given Japan's underlying potential growth rate, which has risen to 2 to 2.5 percent per year, and the combination of catch-up growth closing the current output gap and reforms that will raise the growth rate for quarters to come (though not permanently).

Suggested Citation

  • Adam S. Posen, 2004. "What Went Right in Japan," Policy Briefs PB04-06, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:pbrief:pb04-06

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kimberly Ann Elliott & Richard B. Freeman, 2003. "Can Labor Standards Improve under Globalization?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 338.
    2. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Daniel H. Rosen, 2000. "American Access to China's Marketplace: The Congressional Vote on PNTR," Policy Briefs PB00-3, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    3. Marcus Noland, 1996. "US-China Economic Relations," Working Paper Series WP96-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    4. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Kimberly Ann Elliott, 1994. "Measuring the Costs of Protection in the United States," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 77.
    5. Lori G. Kletzer & Robert E. Litan, 2001. "A Prescription to Relieve Worker Anxiety," Policy Briefs PB01-02, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    6. Robert M. Stern & Katherine Terrell, 2003. "Labor Standards and the World Trade Organization," Working Papers 499, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
    7. Elena Ianchovichina & Will Martin, 2004. "Impacts of China's Accession to the World Trade Organization," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(1), pages 3-27.
    8. C. Fred Bergsten, 1998. "The New Agenda With China," Policy Briefs PB98-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Alan J. Auerbach & William G. Gale, 2009. "Activist fiscal policy to stabilize economic activity," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 327-374.
    2. Anita Tuladhar & Markus Bruckner, 2010. "Public Investment as a Fiscal Stimulus; Evidence from Japan’s Regional Spending During the 1990s," IMF Working Papers 10/110, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Ralph Paprzycki, 2007. "The Determinants of and Prospects for Foreign Direct Investment in Japan," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d07-211, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iie:pbrief:pb04-06. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peterson Institute webmaster). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.