IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ifs/ifsewp/11-02.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

How much do lifetime earnings explain retirement resources?

Author

Listed:
  • Antoine Bozio

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institut des Politiques Publiques, Paris School of Economics)

  • Carl Emmerson

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Gemma Tetlow

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

Abstract

We use a unique dataset, containing individual survey data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing linked to administrative data on earnings histories from administrative records, to construct measures of lifetime earnings and examine how these relate to financial resources in retirement. Retirement income and wealth at retirement is, as expected, positively correlated with lifetime earnings but there is also substantial dispersion in retirement income and retirement wealth among people with similar lifetime earnings. For example, we find that those with greater numerical ability and higher education tend to have greater retirement resources even after controlling for differences in lifetime earnings. The retirement resources of single women are far less well explained by their own lifetime earnings than those of couples or single men. We hypothesise that, as the vast majority of single women in the age group considered had previously been married and are now widowed or divorced, this reflects the fact that we do not observe the lifetime earnings of their former spouses.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoine Bozio & Carl Emmerson & Gemma Tetlow, 2011. "How much do lifetime earnings explain retirement resources?," IFS Working Papers W11/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:11/02
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp1102.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Antoine Bozio & Carl Emmerson & Cormac O'Dea & Gemma Tetlow, 2013. "Savings and wealth of the lifetime rich: evidence from the UK and US," IFS Working Papers W13/30, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Rowena Crawford & Cormac O'Dea, 2014. "Cash and Pensions: Have the elderly in England saved optimally for retirement?," IFS Working Papers W14/22, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. repec:eee:joecag:v:6:y:2015:i:c:p:123-132 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Lührmann, Melanie & Serra-Garcia, Marta & Winter, Joachim, 2015. "Teaching teenagers in finance: Does it work?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 160-174.
    5. Rowena Crawford & Cormac O'Dea, 2014. "Retirement sorted? The adequacy and optimality of wealth among the near-retired," IFS Working Papers W14/23, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. James M. Poterba & Steven F. Venti & David A. Wise, 2015. "What Determines End-of-Life Assets? A Retrospective View," NBER Chapters,in: Insights in the Economics of Aging, pages 127-157 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Winter, Joachim & Lührmann, Melanie & Serra Garcia, Marta, 2013. "The effects of financial literacy training: Evidence from a field experiment in German high schools," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79744, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Lifetime earnings; savings; wealth; retirement;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:11/02. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Emma Hyman). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifsssuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.