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Does Easing Monetary Policy Increase Financial Instability?

  • Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchi
  • Alessandro Rebucci


This paper develops a model featuring both a macroeconomic and a financial stability objective that speaks to the interaction between monetary and macroprudential policies. First, we find that interest rate rigidities in a monopolistic banking system have an asymmetric impact on financial stability: they lead to greater financial instability in response to contractionary shocks, while they act as an automatic financial stabilizer in response to expansionary shocks. Second, we find that when the policy interest rate is the only instrument, a monetary authority subject to the same constraints as private agents cannot always achieve a (constrained) efficient allocation and faces a trade-off between macroeconomic and financial stability in response to contractionary shocks. This has important implications for the role played by U. S. monetary policy in the run-up to the global financial crisis: the model suggests that the weak link in the U. S. policy framework was not the monetary policy stance after 2002, but rather the absence of an effective second policy pillar aimed at preserving financial stability.

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Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4825.

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Date of creation: Feb 2013
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4825
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  1. Alasdair Scott & Pau Rabanal & Prakash Kannan, 2009. "Monetary and Macroprudential Policy Rules in a Model with House Price Booms," IMF Working Papers 09/251, International Monetary Fund.
  2. David Neumark & Steven A. Sharpe, 1989. "Market structure and the nature of price rigidity: evidence from the market for consumer deposits," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 52, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Xavier Freixas & Jean-Charles Rochet, 2008. "Microeconomics of Banking, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262062704, June.
  4. Hannan, Timothy H & Berger, Allen N, 1991. "The Rigidity of Prices: Evidence from the Banking Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 938-45, September.
  5. Otmar Issing, 2009. "Asset Prices and Monetary Policy," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 29(1), pages 45-51, Winter.
  6. Ben S. Bernanke, 2010. "Monetary policy and the housing bubble: a speech at the Annual Meeting of the American Economic Association, Atlanta, Georgia, January 3, 2010," Speech 499, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  7. Narayana R. Kocherlakota, 2000. "Creating business cycles through credit constraints," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Sum, pages 2-10.
  8. repec:fip:fedgsq:y:2010:x:4 is not listed on IDEAS
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