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Gender Earnings Gaps in the Caribbean: Evidence from Barbados and Jamaica

Author

Listed:
  • Annelle Bellony
  • Alejandro Hoyos
  • Hugo Nopo

    ()

Abstract

This paper analyzes gender earnings gaps in Barbados and Jamaica, using a matching comparisons approach. In both countries, as in most of the Caribbean region, females’ educational achievement is higher than that of males. Nonetheless, males’ earnings surpass those of their female peers. Depending on the set of control characteristics, males’ earnings surpass those of females by between 14 and 27 percent of average females’ wages in Barbados, and between 8 and 17 percent of average females’ wages in Jamaica. In the former, the highest earnings gaps are found among low-income workers. Results from both countries confirm a finding that has been recurrent with this matching approach: the complete elimination of gender occupational segregation in labor markets would increase rather than reduce gender earnings gaps. The evidence is mixed regarding segregation by economic sectors. Occupational experience, in the case of Barbados, and job tenure, in the case of Jamaica, help to explain existing gender earnings gaps.

Suggested Citation

  • Annelle Bellony & Alejandro Hoyos & Hugo Nopo, 2010. "Gender Earnings Gaps in the Caribbean: Evidence from Barbados and Jamaica," Research Department Publications 4683, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4683
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    File URL: http://www.iadb.org/research/pub_hits.cfm?pub_id=IDB-WP-210&pub_file_name=pubIDB-WP-210.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Juan Pablo Atal & Hugo Nopo & Natalia Winder, 2009. "New Century, Old Disparities: Gender and Ethnic Wage Gaps in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4640, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Doris Weichselbaumer & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2005. "A Meta-Analysis of the International Gender Wage Gap," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 479-511, July.
    3. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    4. R. N. Olsen & A. Coppin, 2001. "The Determinants of Gender Differences in Income in Trinidad and Tobago," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 31-56.
    5. Juan Pablo Atal & Hugo Nopo & Natalia Winder, 2009. "New Century, Old Disparities: Gender and Ethnic Wage Gaps in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4640, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    6. Hotchkiss, Julie L & Moore, Robert E, 1996. "Gender Compensation Differentials in Jamaica," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(3), pages 657-676, April.
    7. Addington Coppin, 1996. "Male and female earnings in the Caribbean economy of Barbados: A human capital perspective," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 25(2), pages 61-75, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brenda Wyss, 2015. "Seats for the 51 %: Beyond the Business Case for Corporate Board Quotas in Jamaica," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 42(3), pages 211-246, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; Ethnicity; Wage gaps; the Caribbean; Barbados; Jamaica; Matching;

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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