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Remittances in Fragile Settings: a Somali Case Study


  • Anna Lindley

    () (Centre on Migration, Policy and Society, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford)


Literature on conflict has largely overlooked migrants’ remittances, and literature on migrant’s remittances has largely avoided conflict settings. Using a micro-level approach, this paper explores how remittances have affected households coping with conflict and fragility in the Somali city of Hargeisa. Drawing on survey and ethnographic evidence, the paper highlights the transformed geography and diversified participation in remitting, and explores the uneven transnationalisation of family roles. It shows that remittances can help households to meet living expenses, cope with crises, and build livelihoods, although local constraints inhibit the latter. Circulating in the wider community through market relations and social networks, remittances shape Hargeisa’s political economy. The policy implications are explored.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Lindley, 2007. "Remittances in Fragile Settings: a Somali Case Study," HiCN Working Papers 27, Households in Conflict Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:27

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1988. "Migration selectivity and the effects of public programs," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 265-289, December.
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    4. de Walque, Damien, 2004. "The long-term legacy of the Khmer Rouge period in Cambodia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3446, The World Bank.
    5. Miguel, Edward & Roland, Gérard, 2011. "The long-run impact of bombing Vietnam," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 1-15, September.
    6. Pitt, Mark M & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Gibbons, Donna M, 1993. "The Determinants and Consequences of the Placement of Government Programs in Indonesia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 7(3), pages 319-348, September.
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    1. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:230-252 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. L. De & J. Gaillard & W. Friesen & F. Smith, 2015. "Remittances in the face of disasters: a case study of rural Samoa," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 653-672, June.

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