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Fiscal Implications of Emigration




This study examines the fiscal effects of emigration. A dynamic macroeconomic framework is used. The net peresent value of the fiscal effects of different types of individuals' emigration decisions is calculated. Individuals are differentiated w.r.t. age, gender, education, being immigrants or born in Sweden and how long they choose to stay abroad in case of emigration. This study expolores how the fiscal effects of emigration are contingent on these different personal characteristics and is applied to the case of emigration from Sweden in 1998. The estmated aggregate fiscal cost is SEK 11.6 billion or 0.62% of GDP. This cost is significantly larger than the cost of immigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Johansson, Lars, 2007. "Fiscal Implications of Emigration," Research Papers in Economics 2007:1, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sunrpe:2007_0001

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chaim Fershtman & Uri Gneezy, 2001. "Discrimination in a Segmented Society: An Experimental Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 351-377.
    2. Nekby, Lena, 2002. "Employment Convergence of Immigrants and Natives in Sweden," Research Papers in Economics 2002:9, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
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    8. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
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    10. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-661, September.
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    More about this item


    Migration; Emigration; Fiscal Impact; Fiscal Policy; Taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General

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