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Globalization and Uncertainty: Earnings Volatility in Sweden, 1985-2003


  • Hällsten, Martin

    () (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

  • Korpi, Tomas

    () (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

  • Tåhlin, Michael

    () (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)


Earnings volatility has been linked it to economic integration only through contradictory conjectures. We assess globalization’s role by examining volatility trends in manufacturing, private services, and public services. If trade increases uncertainty, volatility trends should differ markedly across industries since manufacturing, in contrast to especially public services, is exposed to international competition. We analyze earnings trajectories in Sweden 1985-2003, a country and period evincing accelerating trade, finding no indications of greater volatility increases in manufacturing.

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  • Hällsten, Martin & Korpi, Tomas & Tåhlin, Michael, 2009. "Globalization and Uncertainty: Earnings Volatility in Sweden, 1985-2003," Working Paper Series 7/2009, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sofiwp:2009_007

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Nber, 1966. "The Measurement and Interpretation of Job Vacancies," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number unkn66-2, January.
    2. Charles Holt & Martin David, 1966. "The Concept of Job Vacancies in a Dynamic Theory of the Labor Market," NBER Chapters,in: The Measurement and Interpretation of Job Vacancies, pages 73-110 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Bent Hansen, 1970. "Excess Demand, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Wages," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(1), pages 1-23.
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    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets

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