IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Costs and Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis. A Cross-Sectional Observational Study in the UK

  • Kobelt, Gisela

    (Health Dynamics International Ltd.)

  • Lindgren, Peter


    (Stockholm Health Economics Consulting AB)

  • Parkin, David


    (Department of Economics, City University)

  • Francis, David A.


    (Neurosciences Center, University Hospital Birmingham)

  • Johnson, Michael


    (Department of Neurology, St Jame´s University Hospital)

  • Bates, David


    (Department of Neurology, Royal VIctoria Infirmary)

  • Jönsson, Bengt


    (Dept. of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics)

Abstract: We performed a cross-sectional, "bottom-up" observational study of resource consumption and quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United Kingdom. Three centers participated in the study. Patients received a questionnaire either by mail or during a clinic visit, and a total of 619 patients returned the questionnaire (the answer rate being around 70%). Patients provided information on all resource consumption, medical and non-medical, work absence and informal care related to their MS. Disease scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS) were available for a majority of patients from the study centers, and were assigned using a matrix of disease (mobility) descriptions and EDSS scores. Mean total cost per patient and year was 16’717 £. When this cost is extrapolated to an estimated patient population in the UK of 80’000, total costs to society are estimated at 1.34 billion £. Direct costs represented 28%, informal care accounted for 26% and indirect costs amounted to 46%. Of the direct costs, an estimated £ per patient or % of total costs are paid for by the NHS. Intangible costs were estimated at 5000 £ per patient and year. The mean age of the cohort was 44 years (disease onset 34), the mean utility measured with EQ-5D was 0.487 (0.919 to –0.594), and the mean EDSS score 5.1 (1.0 to 9.5). All costs (direct, informal care, indirect) increased with increasing EDSS scores, while utilities decreased.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Stockholm School of Economics in its series SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance with number 398.

in new window

Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 04 Oct 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:hastef:0398
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Economic Research Institute, Stockholm School of Economics, P.O. Box 6501, 113 83 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46-(0)8-736 90 00
Fax: +46-(0)8-31 01 57
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:hastef:0398. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Helena Lundin)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.