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Exchange Rate Uncertainty and the Microeconomic Benefits of EMU

Author

Listed:
  • Friberg, Richard

    () (Department of Economics)

  • Vredin, Anders

    () (Department of Economics)

Abstract

This paper attempts to review the argument that EMU leads to benefits from lower exchange rate uncertainty. Two questions are addressed. First, there is the microeconomic question of how exchange rate uncertainty affects firms. Second, there is the macroeconomic question of how EMU will be beneficial for Swedish firms: firms can adjust to exchange rate uncertainty, for instance by pricing-to-market; exchange rate changes may work as "automatic stabilizers"; there is no strong empirical evidence that trading partners, like the U.S., the U.K. and Denmark, are not likely to participate in the monetary union in the near future. For EMU speak the facts that exchange rate uncertainty stems from policy uncertainty, which may be lower inside EMU; that EMU may lower protectionist pressures; and, in particular, that it is very hard for firms ot hedge against total economic exchange rate risk (as opposed to mere transaction risk).

Suggested Citation

  • Friberg, Richard & Vredin, Anders, 1996. "Exchange Rate Uncertainty and the Microeconomic Benefits of EMU," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 127, Stockholm School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:hastef:0127
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Clas Wihlborg, 1994. "EMU—Economic Substance or Political Symbolism?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(5), pages 651-661, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Mihailov, 2009. "Exchange rate pass-through to prices in macrodata: a comparative sensitivity analysis," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 346-377.
    2. Ramkishen Rajan, 2010. "Sand in the Wheels of International Finance: Revisiting the Debate in Light of the East Asian Mayhem," Working Papers id:2686, eSocialSciences.
    3. Bergbom, Lennart, 1998. "Exchange Rate Variability Inside and Outside the EMU," Working Paper Series 1998:26, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    4. Westlund, Hans & Johansson, Magnus & Molinder, Jonas, 2000. "Exchange Rate Sensitivity Of Swedish Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa00p140, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Bowe, Michael & Saltvedt, Thina M., 2004. "Currency invoicing practices, exchange rate volatility and pricing-to-market: evidence from product level data," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 281-308, June.
    6. Alexander Mihailov, 2009. "Exchange rate pass-through to prices in macrodata: a comparative sensitivity analysis," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 346-377.
    7. Graham Bird & Ramkishen Rajan, 2002. "The Evolving Asian Financial Architecture," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2002-03, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    8. John FitzGerald & Fergal Shortall, 1998. "Exchange Rate Changes and the Transmission of Inflation," Papers WP096, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Friberg, Richard, 1998. "In which currency should exporters set their prices?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 59-76, June.
    10. G. Bird & R. Rajan, 2001. "Would International Currency Taxation and Currency Stabilisation in Developing Countries?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 21-38.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange rate uncertainty; EMU; exchange rate exposure;

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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