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The Global Economic Crisis and Migrant Workers: The Case of the Construction Sector in Europe

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  • Vincent Fromentin

    (CEREFIGE - Centre Européen de Recherche en Economie Financière et Gestion des Entreprises - UL - Université de Lorraine)

Abstract

This paper examines the employment response of native and migrant workers over the business cycle in the construction sectors of European countries between 2008 and 2011. Using a dynamic model (Generalized Method of Moments), which accounts for ‘intergroup substitutability', we observe that differences in the cyclical employment patterns of migrants and natives in the construction sector may be due to a potential selection of EU and non-EU migrants who are disproportionately prone to cyclical fluctuations in temporary jobs or a higher turnover rate.
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Suggested Citation

  • Vincent Fromentin, 2014. "The Global Economic Crisis and Migrant Workers: The Case of the Construction Sector in Europe," Post-Print hal-01375699, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01375699
    DOI: 10.1080/10168737.2014.894550
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.univ-lorraine.fr/hal-01375699
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dustmann, Christian & Glitz, Albrecht & Vogel, Thorsten, 2010. "Employment, wages, and the economic cycle: Differences between immigrants and natives," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 1-17, January.
    2. Lachenmaier, Stefan & Rottmann, Horst, 2011. "Effects of innovation on employment: A dynamic panel analysis," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 210-220, March.
    3. Giovanni Peri & Chad Sparber, 2016. "Task Specialization, Immigration, and Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 3, pages 81-115, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    4. Giovanni Peri & Chad Sparber, 2016. "Task Specialization, Immigration, and Wages," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 3, pages 81-115 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Michel Beine & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2007. "Measuring International Skilled Migration: A New Database Controlling for Age of Entry," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 249-254, June.
    6. David Card, 2009. "Immigration and Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 1-21, May.
    7. Dominique M. Gross & Nicolas Schmitt, 2012. "Low- and high-skill migration flows: free mobility versus other determinants," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 1-20, January.
    8. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2010. "Mexican Immigrant Employment Outcomes over the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 316-320, May.
    9. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    10. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    11. Paul J. Devereux, 2004. "Cyclical Quality Adjustment in the Labor Market," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 600-615, January.
    12. Grossman, Jean Baldwin, 1982. "The Substitutability of Natives and Immigrants in Production," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(4), pages 596-603, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vincent Fromentin & Olivier Damette & Benteng Zou, 2017. "The Global Economic Crisis and The Effect of Immigrant Workers on Native-born Employment in Europe," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(6), pages 1068-1088, June.
    2. Vincent Fromentin & Olivier Damette & Benteng Zou, 2014. "The global economic crisis and the effect of immigration on the employment of native-born workers in Europe," CREA Discussion Paper Series 14-22, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.

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