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The state-federal dichotomy in the effects of minimum wages on teenage employment in the United States

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  • Steve Bazen

    (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales)

  • Julie Le Gallo

    () (CRESE - Centre de REcherches sur les Stratégies Economiques (EA 3190) - UFC - Université de Franche-Comté - UBFC - Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté [COMUE])

Abstract

For the period 1984-1997, we find that state-level minimum wage hikes had no negative employment impact whereas federal hikes did. This dichotomy may account for the differences between the results of the 'new economics of the minimum wage' and time series studies.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Steve Bazen & Julie Le Gallo, 2009. "The state-federal dichotomy in the effects of minimum wages on teenage employment in the United States," Post-Print hal-00485041, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00485041
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00485041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 772-793, September.
    2. Stephen Bazen & Julie Le Gallo, 2009. "The Differential Impact Of Federal And State Minimum Wages On Teenage Employment," Working Papers halshs-00382509, HAL.
    3. William Wascher & David Neumark, 2000. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1362-1396, December.
    4. David Brownstone & Robert Valletta, 2001. "The Bootstrap and Multiple Imputations: Harnessing Increased Computing Power for Improved Statistical Tests," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 129-141, Fall.
    5. Stephen Bazen & Velayoudom Marimoutou, 2002. "Looking for a Needle in a Haystack? A Re-examination of the Time Series Relationship between Teenage Employment and Minimum Wages in the United States," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 64(s1), pages 699-725, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Muravyev & Aleksey Oshchepkov, 2016. "The effect of doubling the minimum wage on employment: evidence from Russia," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-20, December.
    2. Alexander Muravyev & Aleksey Oshchepkov, 2013. "Minimum wages and labor market outcomes: evidence from the emerging economy of Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 29/EC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    3. Muravyev, Alexander & Oshchepkov, Aleksey, 2013. "Minimum Wages, Unemployment and Informality: Evidence from Panel Data on Russian Regions," IZA Discussion Papers 7878, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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