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  • Randall Morck


A corporation is an artificial person created for an economic purpose, as described in various aspects of the Theory of the Firm. Recent historical and comparative research shows that corporations in most countries come in groups, each controlled by a single principal. This has implications for various "theories of the firm". The perception that firms ought to be run to maximize shareholder value, though commonplace in financial economics, is also problematic in application.

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  • Randall Morck, 2006. "Corporations," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2101, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:harver:2101

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. repec:fth:prinin:338 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Roger H. Gordon & Joosung Jun & Joel Slemrod, 1993. "Taxes and the Form of Ownership of Foreign Corporate Equity," NBER Chapters,in: Studies in International Taxation, pages 13-46 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Douglas Shackelford & Joel Slemrod, 1998. "The Revenue Consequences of Using Formula Apportionment to Calculate U.S. and Foreign-Source Income: A Firm-Level Analysis," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 5(1), pages 41-59, February.
    3. Ahmed, S., 2004. "Modelling corporate tax liabilities using company accounts: a new framework," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0412, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Ben Tomlin, 2008. "Clearing Hurdles: Key Reforms to Make Small Business More Successful," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 264, May.
    5. P. B. Oyelere & C. R. Emmanuel, 1998. "International transfer pricing and income shifting: evidence from the UK," European Accounting Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(4), pages 623-635.

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