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Subprime mortgages and the housing bubble

  • Jan K. Brueckner
  • Paul S. Calem
  • Leonard I. Nakamura

This paper explores the link between the house-price expectations of mortgage lenders and the extent of subprime lending. It argues that bubble conditions in the housing market are likely to spur subprime lending, with favorable price expectations easing the default concerns of lenders and thus increasing their willingness to extend loans to risky borrowers. Since the demand created by subprime lending feeds back onto house prices, such lending also helps to fuel an emerging housing bubble. The paper, however, focuses on the reverse causal linkage, where subprime lending is a consequence rather than a cause of bubble conditions. These ideas are illustrated in a theoretical model, and empirical work tests for a connection between price expectations and the extent of subprime lending.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia in its series Working Papers with number 11-12.

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Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:11-12
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  1. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Moore, John, 1997. "Credit Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 211-48, April.
  2. Maria Teresa Punzi & Caterina Mendicino & Luisa Lambertini, 2010. "Expectation-Driven Cycles in the Housing Market," 2010 Meeting Papers 251, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Óscar Arce & David López-Salido, 2011. "Housing Bubbles," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 212-41, January.
  4. Charles Himmelberg & Christopher Mayer & Todd Sinai, 2005. "Assessing High House Prices: Bubbles, Fundamentals, and Misperceptions," NBER Working Papers 11643, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Andrey Pavlov & Susan Wachter, 2011. "Subprime Lending and Real Estate Prices," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 1-17, 03.
  6. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  7. DellAriccia, Giovanni & Igan, Deniz & Laeven, Luc, 2008. "Credit Booms and Lending Standards: Evidence From The Subprime Mortgage Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 6683, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. William C. Wheaton & Gleb Nechayev, 2008. "The 1998 ?2005 Housing "Bubble" and the Current "Correction": What’s Different This Time?," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 30(1), pages 1-26.
  9. Christopher L. Foote & Kristopher S. Gerardi & Paul S. Willen, 2008. "Negative equity and foreclosure: theory and evidence," Public Policy Discussion Paper 08-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  10. Timothy J. Riddiough & Howard E. Thompson, 1993. "Commercial Mortgage Pricing with Unobservable Borrower Default Costs," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 21(3), pages 265-291.
  11. Charles D. Anderson & Dennis R. Capozza & Robert Van Order, 2011. "Deconstructing a Mortgage Meltdown: A Methodology for Decomposing Underwriting Quality," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(4), pages 609-631, 06.
  12. Brueckner, Jan K, 2000. "Mortgage Default with Asymmetric Information," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 251-74, May.
  13. Kau James B. & Keenan Donald C. & Kim Taewon, 1994. "Default Probabilities for Mortgages," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 278-296, May.
  14. Coleman IV, Major & LaCour-Little, Michael & Vandell, Kerry D., 2008. "Subprime lending and the housing bubble: Tail wags dog?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 272-290, December.
  15. James B. Kau & Donald C. Keenan & Taewon Kim, 1993. "Transaction Costs, Suboptimal Termination and Default Probabilities," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 21(3), pages 247-263.
  16. Matteo Iacoviello & Stefano Neri, 2007. "Housing Market Spillovers: Evidence from an Estimated DSGE Model," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 659, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 23 Oct 2009.
  17. Karl E. Case & Robert J. Shiller, 2003. "Is There a Bubble in the Housing Market?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(2), pages 299-362.
  18. repec:oup:qjecon:v:124:y:2009:i:4:p:1449-1496 is not listed on IDEAS
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